Avenue Blog

Sheep of the Week: Cormo

Posted by Karen King on

Sheep of the Week: Cormo

Since I've missed a week (or so!) I bring you the Cormo, an Australian breed of sheep developed in Tasmania by crossing Corriedale rams with superfine Saxon Merino ewes in the early 1960s. (The name Cormo is derived from the names of two of the parent breeds, Corriedale and Merino.) To know the Cormo, we need to meet its forebears, the Corriedale and a specific  line of the Merino, the Saxon Merino.  The Corriedale: One parent line of the Cormo is the Corriedale.  The Corriedale is the oldest of all the crossbred breeds, a Merino-Lincoln cross developed almost simultaneously in Australia and New Zealand. With the Corriedale, the goal was to...

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Sheep of the week: Romney

Posted by Karen King on

Sheep of the week: Romney

The very informative website of the American Romney Breeders Association, ARBA, has this to say about the breed: "The American Romney traces its beginnings to the marshy area of Kent in England. Its origin lies with the old, established dual purpose Romney Marsh breed,which was improved with Leicester blood in the nineteenth century. Often swept with harsh winds and heavy rainfall, the Kent landscape is abundant with lush forage. Romney sheep in Kent, England. (Phtoto ID 13472827 © Chris Moncrieff | Dreamstime.com.) These geographic and climatic conditions have led to the development of some specific characteristics in the Romney breed....

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Sheep of the week: Rambouillet

Posted by Karen King on

Sheep of the week: Rambouillet

This gorgeous boy is a Rambouillet ram. (ID 50624239 © Linda Washburn Roberts on Dreamstime.com)   The Rambouillet breed is also known as the Rambouillet Merino or the French Merino. Today's Rambouillet sheep has a royal pedigree. The breed originated in Spain. The Spanish Merino flocks were renowned from the earliest times as producers of the world's finest wool. The Spanish government forbade any exportation of the precious sheep. In 1786 however, Louis XVI of France purchased Spanish Merinos (318 ewes, 41 rams, and seven castrated rams or "wethers") from his cousin, King Charles III of Spain. The new French flock was then developed on an experimental royal farm about 50 km southwest...

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Sheep of the week: Merino

Posted by Karen King on

Sheep of the week: Merino

In our first Sheep of the Week post, we bring you ... the Merino! A Merino ewe. Renowned for the next-to-skin softness of its wool, the Merino sheep is an excellent forager and very adaptable. It is bred predominantly for its wool and its body is generally smaller than that of sheep bred for meat. In the range of sheep sizes, Merinos are medium: ewes, 125-180 pounds; rams, 175-235 pounds. Merino rams have long spiral horns that curve around their faces.  A Merino ram. The modern Merino was developed in Australia. The first Merinos were imported to the US (to Vermont) in 1802. Today,...

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Reflections

Posted by Karen King on

Reflections
Seeing our community in a bowl of scraps.

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